The Difference Between Fake And Real 4K Movies

The resolution of a video or movie can often have a noticeable impact on its quality. Some movies are produced in 4K resolution, which is an ultra high-definition format that maximizes picture quality. 4K is four times larger than 1080p. The internet has bashed or criticized certain films for having “fake” 4K technology. This term may sound negative, but by understanding what this means and why it’s used, you won’t care as much when a film you love isn’t natively produced in 4K resolution.

Media producers sometimes upscale their content rather than working with high resolutions. This is what people mean when they talk about “fake” 4K movies. Filmmakers may create and edit their videos in 2K Digital Intermediate resolution, otherwise known as 2KDI. This resolution is lower than 4K, but once all the editing is complete, the video’s resolution is doubled to 4K. Movies that are produced this way often end up on Ultra HD Blu-Ray discs, which primarily support 4K Ultra HD videos.

While some films have 4K resolution from the very moment they’re created, it’s sometimes advantageous to begin working with a lower resolution. Advanced computer-generated effects and animations, which typically play a huge role in the film industry, are always heavy on hardware. Special effects often take a long time to render. The resolution of a video frame will have a huge impact on how long it takes a computer to compile and finalize it. If certain companies try to create or render their work in 4K, they’ll have to wait abnormally long periods of time. Busy studios will be inconvenienced if they need to work on other projects at the same time or have a set due to date to work around. To speed up the creation process, a video can first be created and rendered in 2KDI.

While some films have 4K resolution from the very moment they’re created, it’s sometimes advantageous to begin working with a lower resolution. Advanced computer-generated effects and animations, which typically play a huge role in the film industry, are always heavy on hardware. Special effects often take a long time to render. The resolution of a video frame will have a huge impact on how long it takes a computer to compile and finalize it. If certain companies try to create or render their work in 4K, they’ll have to wait abnormally long periods of time. Busy studios will be inconvenienced if they need to work on other projects at the same time or have a set due to date to work around. To speed up the creation process, a video can first be created and rendered in 2KDI.

In addition to speeding things up, upscaled videos present many positive qualities that balance out their lack of true 4K resolution. 2KDI is higher than 1080p, which is still a common resolution format heavily used in outdated films or by amateur filmmakers. Upscaled videos also support High Dynamic Range, providing images with advanced shadows and coloring. Furthermore, these videos are capable of streaming their data at high bit rates. This prevents unpleasant visual artifacts that are often present in slower videos.

When the resolution of a video is upscaled, new pixels are automatically added in-between the original pixels. A computer program will typically make assumptions and fill in the blanks. While this process can be somewhat accurate, this indicates that an upscaled video is prone to error. Errors produced from upscaling are likely only noticeable in film production, but they exist nonetheless. A computer cannot always figure out what details are missing from an image when its size is increased.

Real 4K movies are natively produced and published at a high resolution. UHD Blu-Rays, which use that high resolution, are capable of supporting High Dynamic Range, high color gamut and backwards compatibility with older HD televisions. Ultra HD Blu-Ray has a bit depth of 10, which means it provides a large number of colors in every image. Negative artifacts such as color banding can be effectively reduced with a large number of available colors. Millions of colors are visible to the human eye, but only a fraction of those colors can be represented on a television screen. Movies must have a way to manage and present those colors without slowing down or reducing in quality.

The capacity and functionality of your television sometimes plays a larger role in video quality than native resolution. For example, screens without a 4K display will likely not reproduce the exact quality a movie was produced in. Some televisions produce their images without a backlight, using other electrically-charged materials instead. This adds more shading and contrast to every frame of every video they display. Other televisions convert and manipulate their LED lights to produce a wider range of available colors. While a native 4K resolution is certainly ideal, the resolution alone will not always be a final factor in determining whether or not a film is visually pleasing.

UHD Blu-Rays

At the time they were first produced, UHD Blu-Rays were exclusive and luxurious. Even though they’re more common today, Blu-Ray products and 4K televisions are notably expensive. There’s an increased prevalence of upscaled 2KDI movies, which can often be hard to distinguish from real 4K movies. While 4K is not obsolete, it’s clear that such a high resolution is not always an ideal or affordable option.

To figure out if a movie has an upscaled resolution or a real 4K resolution, you have to search through the internet. That fact alone is enough to prove that upscaling a film does not create obvious effects. Since that is the case, you shouldn’t obsess over this when you’re deciding what to watch. The technological investments you intend to make should have a bigger influence on your decision-making. It helps to remember that 4K televisions can upscale lower resolutions automatically, whereas lower resolution displays commonly lack that capacity. Regardless of whether or not a movie is true or false 4K, the display you own will determine whether or not you even have the option to view that movie in such great quality.

Movie watchers and video producers care a lot about visual quality. In this day and age, very high resolutions and powerful displays are available for those who want an immersive experience. When you’re searching for a movie to watch, there’s a chance you’ll care about how crisp the images are. If you come across a movie that was upscaled from 2KDI to 4K, don’t immediately avoid or disqualify it. Some filmmakers needed to upscale their movies for productivity reasons. Additionally, you may not even be able to tell the difference; an upscaled movie may look exactly like true 4K. Consider the display you have more often than you consider a video’s native resolution. Be mindful of your investments and acknowledge that extremely crisp images aren’t always necessary. 8K television displays are now available, but not many people feel inclined to purchase them. That is primarily due to their cost, but also the fact that Ultra HD is rarely noticeable to the naked human eye. Visual quality can be detected, but there comes a point where a video cannot get any crisper. The qualities you seek should center more around a video’s content, not its resolution.

Real 4K Movies

A complete list of real 4K movies on Ultra HD Blu Ray.

1776Real 4K
2001: A Space OdysseyReal 4K
A Beautiful Planet Real 4K
A Charlie Brown Christmas Real 4K
A Charlie Brown Thanksgiving Real 4K
A Few Good Men Real 4K
A Futile And Stupid Gesture Real 4K
About Last Night (2014) Real 4K
Across The Universe Real 4K
After Earth Real 4K
Air Force One Real 4K
Allegiant Real 4K
Allied Real 4K
Aloha Real 4K
Altered Carbon Real 4K
American Hustle Real 4K
Angels and Demons Real 4K
Annie (2014) Real 4K
Annihilation Real 4K
Apocalypse Now Real 4K
Apollo 13 Real 4K
Assassin’s Creed Real 4K
Backdraft Real 4K
Bad Boys Real 4K
Bad Boys 2 Real 4K
Bad Santa 2 Real 4K
Bad Teacher Real 4K
Bad Times At The El Royale Real 4K
Batman Begins Real 4K
Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice Real 4K
Battle: Los Angeles Real 4K
Better Call Saul Real 4K
Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk Real 4K
Black Hawk Down Real 4K
Black Mass Real 4K
Black Mirror Real 4K
Black Panther Real 4K
BlacKkKlansman Real 4K
Blade Runner Real 4K
Blade Runner 2049 Real 4K
Bloodline Real 4K
Blue Planet 2 Real 4K
Body Double Real 4K
Bosch Real 4K
Bram Stoker’s Dracula Real 4K
Braveheart Real 4K
Brawl In Cell Block 99 Real 4K
Breaking Bad Real 4K
Bright Real 4K
Butch Cassidy And The Sundance Kid Real 4K
Chappie Real 4K
Christine Real 4K
Clear And Present Danger Real 4K
Cliffhanger Real 4K
Close Encounters of the Third Kind Real 4K
Complete Unknown Real 4K
Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon Real 4K
Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon: Sword of Destiny Real 4K
Daredevil Real 4K
Darkest Hour Real 4K
Deadpool Real 4K
Deliver Us From Evil Real 4k
Die Hard Real 4K
District 9 Real 4K
Dr. Seuss’ How the Grinch Stole Christmas Real 4K
Dunkirk Real 4K
DVS UltraHD HDR-10 Video Calibration Disc Real 4K
Dynasties Real 4K
E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial Real 4K
Early ManReal 4K
Earth: One Amazing Day Real 4K
Easy Real 4K
Edward Scissorhands Real 4K
Elvis & Nixon Real 4K
Evil Dead (2013) Real 4K
Ex Machina Real 4K
Fantastic Beasts And Where to Find Them Real 4K
Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald Real 4K
Field of Dreams Real 4K
Flaked Real 4K
Flight of the Butterflies Real 4K
Flying Clipper (Mediterranean Holiday) Real 4K
Forest Gump Real 4K
Fuller House Real 4K
Fury Real 4K
Ghost in the Shell (2017) Real 4K
Ghostbusters Real 4K
Ghostbusters (1984) Real 4K
Ghostbusters 2 Real 4K
Ghostbusters 2 (1989) Real 4K
Gladiator Real 4K
Glory Real 4K
Glow Real 4K
Godless Real 4K
Godzilla (1998) Real 4K
Gone Girl Real 4K
GoodFellas Real 4K
Grace and Frankie Real 4K
Grease Real 4K
Groundhog Day Real 4K